Entries by Frank Carus

General Bulletin for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Avalanches, falling rocks and ice, undermined snow, large glide cracks and icy refrozen surfaces will remain a threat in and below steep terrain as long as snow remains in the mountains. Spring weather brings about rapid changes to the snowpack and changes objective hazards accordingly. Remember to ski, climb or hike the snowpack and weather conditions that exist and not a date on the calendar!

Avalanche Advisory for Thursday, April 19, 2018

Due to the rugged ice crust on the mountain, you’ll find two distinct threats to safe travelling in steep terrain. The recent sleet storm finished with freezing rain which created a thick ice crust over top of a widespread glaze of sleet, wet snow and ice. New snow fell at the end of the storm on Tuesday afternoon and was able to stick in some areas, but not very well. Due to scouring of the snow, wind exposed, scoured areas above tree-line will require crampons for safe travel while many lee areas have collected enough snow to build some wind slabs. Low visibility, and other duties kept us from gathering many observations yesterday and this morning, but it seems that the ice crust will be the dominant surface in steep terrain. In areas where the new snow adhered to the ice, hand shears low in Hillman’s Highway showed that the new wind slabs failed easily in the new snow. Only a small amount (2-3”) of the recent snow was light enough to be carried by the wind and blown into our terrain but the icy bed surface will up the ante if you get swept off your feet. Human triggered avalanches are unlikely today unless you seek out these areas of wind slab. Additionally, light winds may allow the 1-2” of new snow that falls to build into small but more sensitive, new wind slabs. If we receive the upper end of the forecast amount, human triggered avalanches will become more likely and increasingly widespread.